The Grinch Review

Illumination Delivers Another Perfectly Acceptable if not Necessarily Exceptional Animated Diversion in this Re-Telling of the Dr. Suess Classic.

Bohemian Rhapsody Review

This Queen biopic Fails to Transcend the Genre the Way its Subjects Transcended the Music Scene, but at Least the Music is Good.

Overlord Review

Overlord Combines the Terror of War with the Terror of a Zombie Apocalypse and Accomplishes Exactly what it Means To.

The Nutcraker and the Four Realms Review

An All-Star Cast Attempts to Usher The Nutcracker Story to a New Generation Via Disney Blockbuster, but Unfortunately the Results Fall Short of the Ambition.

A Star is Born Review

Bradley Cooper Writes, Directs, Sings, and Stars in this Fourth Incarnation of this Story Alongside Lady Gaga to Rapturous Results.

CATFISH Review

It is hard to explain how this film unfolds and affects you without giving too much away. The thing about the movie is that you don't really know what kind of movie you are getting. It is made to look like a hitchcockian thriller in its trailer and you are promised a conclusion that holds a startling revelation. But again, to explain would be to give something away and the filmmakers don't want that. So I will tell you that this may not be exactly what you expect. It isn't, but it is a very intriguing story and one that explores the many facets of attempting to conduct relationships, whether they be romantic or not through facebook or anything similiar. Whether this is a real documentary or not remains to be revealed to the public, but I can see where at least sections of this film could most definitely be real and if they aren't Mr. Nev Schulman is a great actor and should definitely get more roles soon. The film centers around Schulman, a New York photographer, as he first develops a relationship with an 8 year-old girl who made a painting of one of his photographs. This leads to him getting to know this entire family from Michigan, "the facebook family". This is a well made film though and Nev along with his brother Ariel and friend Henry Joost document this relationship from its beginning and as Nev gets more involved they begin to investigate things and thus this leads to things getting a little strange. The film has elements of comedy, drama, tension-compiling many emotions that make this feel like such a legitimate film. What I can say about the end without giving too much away is that it is very moving and scary at the same time while the audience and the filmmakers feel sympathetic in spite of the situation that has presented itself. I would definitely reccomend the film, but I would say not to go in expecting too much of a scary film. This is a strangely affecting tale of someone dealing with the life they always dreamed of but never saw come true. It is an eye-opening glimpse into the possibilities that viral connections can bring. It is certainly shocking and somewhat scary, but not like you will be expecting when you purchase your ticket.

CATFISH Review

It is hard to explain how this film unfolds and affects you without giving too much away. The thing about the movie is that you don't really know what kind of movie you are getting. It is made to look like a hitchcockian thriller in its trailer and you are promised a conclusion that holds a startling revelation. But again, to explain would be to give something away and the filmmakers don't want that. So I will tell you that this may not be exactly what you expect. It isn't, but it is a very intriguing story and one that explores the many facets of attempting to conduct relationships, whether they be romantic or not through facebook or anything similiar. Whether this is a real documentary or not remains to be revealed to the public, but I can see where at least sections of this film could most definitely be real and if they aren't Mr. Nev Schulman is a great actor and should definitely get more roles soon. The film centers around Schulman, a New York photographer, as he first develops a relationship with an 8 year-old girl who made a painting of one of his photographs. This leads to him getting to know this entire family from Michigan, "the facebook family". This is a well made film though and Nev along with his brother Ariel and friend Henry Joost document this relationship from its beginning and as Nev gets more involved they begin to investigate things and thus this leads to things getting a little strange. The film has elements of comedy, drama, tension-compiling many emotions that make this feel like such a legitimate film. What I can say about the end without giving too much away is that it is very moving and scary at the same time while the audience and the filmmakers feel sympathetic in spite of the situation that has presented itself. I would definitely reccomend the film, but I would say not to go in expecting too much of a scary film. This is a strangely affecting tale of someone dealing with the life they always dreamed of but never saw come true. It is an eye-opening glimpse into the possibilities that viral connections can bring. It is certainly shocking and somewhat scary, but not like you will be expecting when you purchase your ticket.

HEREAFTER Review

After last year's 'Invictus' I was glad to see Eastwood going even further into realm he might not explore. Simply reading a plot synopsis for this movie one would not expect Eastwood to touch this, but with him at the helm and the script being penned by Peter Morgan (the guy who wrote 'The Queen' and 'Frost/Nixon') how could this not be one of the more interesting films of the year. I say interesting simply because of the subject matter and the fact its source was two guys who couldn't have been further from this type of content. The result is definitely interesting and is certainly one of Eastwood's more emotionally jarring films. I feel like I was one of the only people who enjoyed 'Changeling' a few years ago, but that film completely swept me off my feet with its moments of high emotional strain and at moments 'Hereafter' does the same. When having three parallel story lines concerning encounters with death it is hard to avoid this though. The film opens with a breathtaking action sequence based around the 2004 Indonesian tsunami and introduces one of our main characters played by Cecil De France and serves as her cause for seeing life in a whole new life. One thing I think actually takes away from the film is the casting of Matt Damon. I like Mr. Damon and his films very much, I find him a reliable actor and a seemingly good person, and his few scenes here with the wonderful Bryce Dallas Howard are among the films best, but his presence as a movie star in this role causes the audience to get the wrong idea. This seems a misstep by the director as he should see these story lines are depending on one another and to have an outside force taking from the story is not what was needed. There are plenty of little quirks the character is given through the script that would supply the role with likeability even if a star like Damon wasn't playing him. I especially enjoyed the fact he was a huge Dickens fan and that this plays a role in the conclusion of the film. Damon's role as a man who has a gift to speak with the dead was also the role, I had the most concern with. How was Eastwood going to make this credible without sounding hokey? Of course the answer was to ground it in science and it does work, we never question that Damon's character is some type of weirdo and the film does a good job of setting him apart from those kooks who are faking it through the experiences of our third main character. For me, the story of the British twins, both played by Frankie McLaren, is the most moving and the most intriguing. It has so many elements, the drug addicted mother, child services, living with a new family, losing a brother. It is the heaviest of the three story lines and while all three of them are left to feel alone in the world it is interesting that the twins and french journalist feel pushed to the side while Damon's character feels central, as if to hold all three plot lines together. It doesn't, any of them could have done so as evidenced by how they converge in the last section of the film which is somewhat strained but I bought into it because I wanted to see how this film would wrap up. Beginning with such a bang, this film gets quieter and quieter as it goes along and ends on a simple note. It is fulfilling though and Eastwood's simple score is a welcome difference than I expected this film to have. It was made to look more epic in the trailer, but you would be highly disappointed if you went in expecting that. This is simply a movie that speculates on a question no one can truly answer. It offers some interesting perspective and reveals some truly heartbreaking moments when dealing with the most painful thing on earth: the loss of a loved one. It is no doubt a good film, but the feeling it could have been better doesn't escape me. The script could have brought things together better or not tried to make everything so equal. Eastwood should have realized what casting Damon would do-there is certainly a more interesting movie to be imagined from this one, but I will take what I got-it wasn't bad. It was certainly affecting.

HEREAFTER Review

After last year's 'Invictus' I was glad to see Eastwood going even further into realm he might not explore. Simply reading a plot synopsis for this movie one would not expect Eastwood to touch this, but with him at the helm and the script being penned by Peter Morgan (the guy who wrote 'The Queen' and 'Frost/Nixon') how could this not be one of the more interesting films of the year. I say interesting simply because of the subject matter and the fact its source was two guys who couldn't have been further from this type of content. The result is definitely interesting and is certainly one of Eastwood's more emotionally jarring films. I feel like I was one of the only people who enjoyed 'Changeling' a few years ago, but that film completely swept me off my feet with its moments of high emotional strain and at moments 'Hereafter' does the same. When having three parallel story lines concerning encounters with death it is hard to avoid this though. The film opens with a breathtaking action sequence based around the 2004 Indonesian tsunami and introduces one of our main characters played by Cecil De France and serves as her cause for seeing life in a whole new life. One thing I think actually takes away from the film is the casting of Matt Damon. I like Mr. Damon and his films very much, I find him a reliable actor and a seemingly good person, and his few scenes here with the wonderful Bryce Dallas Howard are among the films best, but his presence as a movie star in this role causes the audience to get the wrong idea. This seems a misstep by the director as he should see these story lines are depending on one another and to have an outside force taking from the story is not what was needed. There are plenty of little quirks the character is given through the script that would supply the role with likeability even if a star like Damon wasn't playing him. I especially enjoyed the fact he was a huge Dickens fan and that this plays a role in the conclusion of the film. Damon's role as a man who has a gift to speak with the dead was also the role, I had the most concern with. How was Eastwood going to make this credible without sounding hokey? Of course the answer was to ground it in science and it does work, we never question that Damon's character is some type of weirdo and the film does a good job of setting him apart from those kooks who are faking it through the experiences of our third main character. For me, the story of the British twins, both played by Frankie McLaren, is the most moving and the most intriguing. It has so many elements, the drug addicted mother, child services, living with a new family, losing a brother. It is the heaviest of the three story lines and while all three of them are left to feel alone in the world it is interesting that the twins and french journalist feel pushed to the side while Damon's character feels central, as if to hold all three plot lines together. It doesn't, any of them could have done so as evidenced by how they converge in the last section of the film which is somewhat strained but I bought into it because I wanted to see how this film would wrap up. Beginning with such a bang, this film gets quieter and quieter as it goes along and ends on a simple note. It is fulfilling though and Eastwood's simple score is a welcome difference than I expected this film to have. It was made to look more epic in the trailer, but you would be highly disappointed if you went in expecting that. This is simply a movie that speculates on a question no one can truly answer. It offers some interesting perspective and reveals some truly heartbreaking moments when dealing with the most painful thing on earth: the loss of a loved one. It is no doubt a good film, but the feeling it could have been better doesn't escape me. The script could have brought things together better or not tried to make everything so equal. Eastwood should have realized what casting Damon would do-there is certainly a more interesting movie to be imagined from this one, but I will take what I got-it wasn't bad. It was certainly affecting.

SECRETARIAT Review

I didn't do much research before going in to 'Secretariat', but I did enough to know he won the Triple Crown in 1973 and was the first to do so in twenty-five years. I didn't feel this would greatly interfere with the suspense of the movie seeing as those who are probably going to see a film about a race horse would most likely know more of the facts than I did. It is amazing what Secretariat accomplished in the racing world, but that is not really what this film is about. It is about the owner, the woman, Penny Chenery, who, against everyone else's suggestions keeps believing in Secretariat. Diane Lane plays her with great conviction no matter how many cliched inspirational pieces of dialogue she is forced to spit out. Lane anchors the film with her performance though, under any lesser hands it would have turned into a cheesefest, but instead in the most Disney of ways she makes this a heartwarming tale we can't help but smile at. This is a feel-good movie and it plays that card to its hilt. There is one particular moment in the film where Chenery is standing, watching all the people she loves dancing and laughing with one another. It is one of those cumulative moments that is hard to describe, but you know it when you feel it. That is what this movie is though, it is a movie of moments which does lead to some pacing issues in the beginning. It isn't terribly noticeable, but until we get into the real knitty gritty of the races something is just a bit awkward and there were certainly some unnecessary dialogue insertions that elicited some laughs, but despite knowing how everything will turn out I was still in suspense and excited, if not to see Secretariat run, but for the beautiful racing footage that Director Randall Wallace and his team captures of these creatures fully invested in the moment. Something is to be said for John Malkovich as well who stole every scene he was in in 'RED' and here as the flamboyant trainer Lucien Laurin he gives the film a light humorous touch that saves the film from completely drowning in its own sap. Malkovich, as he did in the aforementioned film, drops in from time to time and simply makes the film more enjoyable. His interactions with everyone around him make you laugh because you are unsure of what he will and won't say. Needless to say I enjoyed his bits most about the film, but don't exclude a solid supporting cast that keep subplots having to deal with family and money going in a way that doesn't leave to much story solely on the horse races. 'Secretariat' is the movie you probably expect it to be when you buy your ticket, and that isn't a bad thing, it truly is a little inspirational and I was never not entertained while watching it, but I did occasionally find myself wondering things outside of the film...so not completely enthralling, but let's just say it bested my expectations.

SECRETARIAT Review

I didn't do much research before going in to 'Secretariat', but I did enough to know he won the Triple Crown in 1973 and was the first to do so in twenty-five years. I didn't feel this would greatly interfere with the suspense of the movie seeing as those who are probably going to see a film about a race horse would most likely know more of the facts than I did. It is amazing what Secretariat accomplished in the racing world, but that is not really what this film is about. It is about the owner, the woman, Penny Chenery, who, against everyone else's suggestions keeps believing in Secretariat. Diane Lane plays her with great conviction no matter how many cliched inspirational pieces of dialogue she is forced to spit out. Lane anchors the film with her performance though, under any lesser hands it would have turned into a cheesefest, but instead in the most Disney of ways she makes this a heartwarming tale we can't help but smile at. This is a feel-good movie and it plays that card to its hilt. There is one particular moment in the film where Chenery is standing, watching all the people she loves dancing and laughing with one another. It is one of those cumulative moments that is hard to describe, but you know it when you feel it. That is what this movie is though, it is a movie of moments which does lead to some pacing issues in the beginning. It isn't terribly noticeable, but until we get into the real knitty gritty of the races something is just a bit awkward and there were certainly some unnecessary dialogue insertions that elicited some laughs, but despite knowing how everything will turn out I was still in suspense and excited, if not to see Secretariat run, but for the beautiful racing footage that Director Randall Wallace and his team captures of these creatures fully invested in the moment. Something is to be said for John Malkovich as well who stole every scene he was in in 'RED' and here as the flamboyant trainer Lucien Laurin he gives the film a light humorous touch that saves the film from completely drowning in its own sap. Malkovich, as he did in the aforementioned film, drops in from time to time and simply makes the film more enjoyable. His interactions with everyone around him make you laugh because you are unsure of what he will and won't say. Needless to say I enjoyed his bits most about the film, but don't exclude a solid supporting cast that keep subplots having to deal with family and money going in a way that doesn't leave to much story solely on the horse races. 'Secretariat' is the movie you probably expect it to be when you buy your ticket, and that isn't a bad thing, it truly is a little inspirational and I was never not entertained while watching it, but I did occasionally find myself wondering things outside of the film...so not completely enthralling, but let's just say it bested my expectations.

THE GIRL WHO PLAYED WITH FIRE Review

Neither as grand in scale or story as its predecessor, 'The Girl Who Played With Fire' is more of a crime and cop drama than the grand murder mystery we were presented with in part one. This sequel takes its cues from the subplot of the first film-dealing with a ring of prostitution and murder. I found it odd that the film never really brought Lisbeth and Mikael together until the conclusion of this one, but I also don't know where 'Hornet's Nest' picks up or what its storyline consists of. With the first film though, the pairing of them was one of the highlights of the film, the team they made in solving the murders would have been just as affective in this second installment had they at least corresponded more often. To put it simply, though alot seems to be going on in the film, not much really happens. Histories are revealed about some minor characters we were introduced to in the first part and this opens up new mysteries involving Lisbeths past and her reasons or causes for being the kind of person she is today. One thing the film does do nicely is pacing. Whereas 'Dragon Tattoo' always felt it dragged a bit near the end, this one flies by with constant action and suspense. It may be more run of the mill than its predecessor but it lacks no sense of adventure. The mystery aspect is what slightly disappointed me the most, not having read any of the Larsson novels on which these films are based, I am still unsure as to the entire mood or environment he was capturing and so I guess I am saying that I don't know what kind of state of mind I am supposed to be in when watching these movies, I have no pre-assumptions about these films, I go in blindly and so I am unsure that my reactions are the same as those who have more context of the world. This shouldn't matter though as the films should accomplish the task of letting me into this world as I watch the movie and I felt the first one did, I became completely involved and caught up in the story, but with this middle part I found it to be more of a passive experience. I enjoyed it, found it intriguing and was of course happy to see Noomi Rapace kick some serious butt as Lisbeth, but it just didn't have that spark. This is true with most second parts of a series though, there is always that lagging middle section that can neither be our introduction to a new world or the grand finale, it is simply the connector piece and few have been able to make one that doesn't suffer from these kind of restraints. 'The Girl Who Played With Fire' offers a lot of insight on our main heroine, but besides this no doubt vital development we are left mostly to admire the Swedish scenery and anticipate the final chapter in the series. Here's to hoping it returns to the realm of something I don't expect to see and that Lisbeth goes out the way she should. With Ms. Rapace in the role there is no doubt she will.

THE GIRL WHO PLAYED WITH FIRE Review

Neither as grand in scale or story as its predecessor, 'The Girl Who Played With Fire' is more of a crime and cop drama than the grand murder mystery we were presented with in part one. This sequel takes its cues from the subplot of the first film-dealing with a ring of prostitution and murder. I found it odd that the film never really brought Lisbeth and Mikael together until the conclusion of this one, but I also don't know where 'Hornet's Nest' picks up or what its storyline consists of. With the first film though, the pairing of them was one of the highlights of the film, the team they made in solving the murders would have been just as affective in this second installment had they at least corresponded more often. To put it simply, though alot seems to be going on in the film, not much really happens. Histories are revealed about some minor characters we were introduced to in the first part and this opens up new mysteries involving Lisbeths past and her reasons or causes for being the kind of person she is today. One thing the film does do nicely is pacing. Whereas 'Dragon Tattoo' always felt it dragged a bit near the end, this one flies by with constant action and suspense. It may be more run of the mill than its predecessor but it lacks no sense of adventure. The mystery aspect is what slightly disappointed me the most, not having read any of the Larsson novels on which these films are based, I am still unsure as to the entire mood or environment he was capturing and so I guess I am saying that I don't know what kind of state of mind I am supposed to be in when watching these movies, I have no pre-assumptions about these films, I go in blindly and so I am unsure that my reactions are the same as those who have more context of the world. This shouldn't matter though as the films should accomplish the task of letting me into this world as I watch the movie and I felt the first one did, I became completely involved and caught up in the story, but with this middle part I found it to be more of a passive experience. I enjoyed it, found it intriguing and was of course happy to see Noomi Rapace kick some serious butt as Lisbeth, but it just didn't have that spark. This is true with most second parts of a series though, there is always that lagging middle section that can neither be our introduction to a new world or the grand finale, it is simply the connector piece and few have been able to make one that doesn't suffer from these kind of restraints. 'The Girl Who Played With Fire' offers a lot of insight on our main heroine, but besides this no doubt vital development we are left mostly to admire the Swedish scenery and anticipate the final chapter in the series. Here's to hoping it returns to the realm of something I don't expect to see and that Lisbeth goes out the way she should. With Ms. Rapace in the role there is no doubt she will.

WINTER'S BONE Review

In what has been a highly praised film this year, I rented 'Winter's Bone' to see what all the fuss was about. Not knowing much of the plot except for that it was based in the Ozarks made for an interesting watch as I waited for the story to unfold without having any prior notions of where it may go. With a strong, desperate and dedicated performance by Jennifer Lawrence this film takes a deep look into poverty in the south and the odd social landscape that these living situations and state of minds entail. The movie focuses around Lawrence's character Ree who, is left to look after her two younger siblings after her mother is deemed "sick" and her father never seemed to be around much or good for anything Ree's entire life. The sad part of this is exemplified early in the film as Ree takes her brother and sister to school. She is only seventeen and is unable to act as a regular teenager because of her home life. It is clear she yearns for some type of normalcy, but the fact she does what she has to and doesn't moan about it once gives strong indications as to the kind of person she is. This, to me, shows the strongest aspect of the script. The character development is to be admired, even in the supporting role of Ree's uncle, John Hawkes makes Teardrop a man we are unsure of, who speaks lines like "I already said no with my mouth" that will send chills up your spine. Over the course of the film the tone switches from tales from the southern ghetto to a dark shaded mystery of what exactly is going on concerning Ree's absentee father. Using the house and land Ree supports her family with as his bond puts the family in a situation of getting daddy to show up for court so the law doesn't take it from them. Problem is, daddy is nowhere to be found and no one wants to talk about him. This sends Ree on one of the more ugly goose chases you might have seen lately. Including the ugly sides of people just trying to scrape by and those doing what they can to help out friends and blood relations. The film encompasses a small community of nasty women and shady men, all surrounded by naked trees and signs of time passed. The environment is just a nasty character as the people around Ree, and plays a crucial role in the small but extremely rough and brutal climax of the film. Finally, as the film is quite moving and presents a world not too many are familiar with outside those who live in it, but it never makes for a grand drama or a film you might go on about for days after you see it. It is less of a story and more like a poem, a stark and sadly moving poem.

WINTER'S BONE Review

In what has been a highly praised film this year, I rented 'Winter's Bone' to see what all the fuss was about. Not knowing much of the plot except for that it was based in the Ozarks made for an interesting watch as I waited for the story to unfold without having any prior notions of where it may go. With a strong, desperate and dedicated performance by Jennifer Lawrence this film takes a deep look into poverty in the south and the odd social landscape that these living situations and state of minds entail. The movie focuses around Lawrence's character Ree who, is left to look after her two younger siblings after her mother is deemed "sick" and her father never seemed to be around much or good for anything Ree's entire life. The sad part of this is exemplified early in the film as Ree takes her brother and sister to school. She is only seventeen and is unable to act as a regular teenager because of her home life. It is clear she yearns for some type of normalcy, but the fact she does what she has to and doesn't moan about it once gives strong indications as to the kind of person she is. This, to me, shows the strongest aspect of the script. The character development is to be admired, even in the supporting role of Ree's uncle, John Hawkes makes Teardrop a man we are unsure of, who speaks lines like "I already said no with my mouth" that will send chills up your spine. Over the course of the film the tone switches from tales from the southern ghetto to a dark shaded mystery of what exactly is going on concerning Ree's absentee father. Using the house and land Ree supports her family with as his bond puts the family in a situation of getting daddy to show up for court so the law doesn't take it from them. Problem is, daddy is nowhere to be found and no one wants to talk about him. This sends Ree on one of the more ugly goose chases you might have seen lately. Including the ugly sides of people just trying to scrape by and those doing what they can to help out friends and blood relations. The film encompasses a small community of nasty women and shady men, all surrounded by naked trees and signs of time passed. The environment is just a nasty character as the people around Ree, and plays a crucial role in the small but extremely rough and brutal climax of the film. Finally, as the film is quite moving and presents a world not too many are familiar with outside those who live in it, but it never makes for a grand drama or a film you might go on about for days after you see it. It is less of a story and more like a poem, a stark and sadly moving poem.

PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 2 Review

As with the first one, I was skeptical, not because of the hype that surrounded it this time, but because of the fact there seemed no logical way to make a sequel to this kind of a movie. The reason the first was so successful was because of the mystery around the film...was it real or no? Of course it wasn't, but we can always imagine what might be scarier might actually be true right? It doesn't matter not anymore, though the existence of a sequel discredits the franchise completely they somehow managed to make one that works. First things first, this is no sequel, it is a prequel and it lets us in on why things became so hokey in the first installment. And as the first film did, this one sets up its location, its reasons for having everything on film this time being the family has security cameras installed (the film also re-enforces why Micah from the first film decides to purchase a camera). We get the lay of the land and we are introduced to all the key characters and we see their points of view on small yet strange occurrences that have been happening around their house. The thing that elevates these films above other scary movies right now are the fact they let things simmer, they don't go for the kill right away and try to make you jump out of your seat. What this sequel does as well if not a little better than its predecessor is the way it pulls us in with the small stuff first and when we least expect it just throws all the big fireworks at us, taking us completely off guard. Though this may cause some people to see it as nothing more than a rehash of the first, but why change a formula that worked so well? To have changed things up would have been to make a sequel at the level of 'Blair Witch 2'. The film does have a nice spin on the story though, making this family the relatives of Katie from the first film and tying things to her family history that goes well with some demon lessons we get via the most level-headed character in the movie-a 16 year-old girl. This leads to the impressive fact that none of these no name actors come off as bad actors. What is so appealing about that first half of the movie is how much we come to believe in these people as normal and trustworthy human beings that could just as easily live next door to us. They convey a sense of sarcasm and authentic relational connections that when weirder and weirder things begin to happen the results are more affecting. Less being more is what the makers of these movies keep in mind and it will work every time though I really hope they don't plan on making a third one. Let's not let this become the next 'Saw', but instead stop while they're ahead and keep in tact this credible horror franchise that actually causes viewers to be genuinely frightened as they exit the theater.

PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 2 Review

As with the first one, I was skeptical, not because of the hype that surrounded it this time, but because of the fact there seemed no logical way to make a sequel to this kind of a movie. The reason the first was so successful was because of the mystery around the film...was it real or no? Of course it wasn't, but we can always imagine what might be scarier might actually be true right? It doesn't matter not anymore, though the existence of a sequel discredits the franchise completely they somehow managed to make one that works. First things first, this is no sequel, it is a prequel and it lets us in on why things became so hokey in the first installment. And as the first film did, this one sets up its location, its reasons for having everything on film this time being the family has security cameras installed (the film also re-enforces why Micah from the first film decides to purchase a camera). We get the lay of the land and we are introduced to all the key characters and we see their points of view on small yet strange occurrences that have been happening around their house. The thing that elevates these films above other scary movies right now are the fact they let things simmer, they don't go for the kill right away and try to make you jump out of your seat. What this sequel does as well if not a little better than its predecessor is the way it pulls us in with the small stuff first and when we least expect it just throws all the big fireworks at us, taking us completely off guard. Though this may cause some people to see it as nothing more than a rehash of the first, but why change a formula that worked so well? To have changed things up would have been to make a sequel at the level of 'Blair Witch 2'. The film does have a nice spin on the story though, making this family the relatives of Katie from the first film and tying things to her family history that goes well with some demon lessons we get via the most level-headed character in the movie-a 16 year-old girl. This leads to the impressive fact that none of these no name actors come off as bad actors. What is so appealing about that first half of the movie is how much we come to believe in these people as normal and trustworthy human beings that could just as easily live next door to us. They convey a sense of sarcasm and authentic relational connections that when weirder and weirder things begin to happen the results are more affecting. Less being more is what the makers of these movies keep in mind and it will work every time though I really hope they don't plan on making a third one. Let's not let this become the next 'Saw', but instead stop while they're ahead and keep in tact this credible horror franchise that actually causes viewers to be genuinely frightened as they exit the theater.

JACKASS 3D Review

Let's be for real here, this is 'Jackass' and there is no need to review it whatsoever. If you plan on going to see this movie you know what you are getting yourself into. This is another extended edition of the MTV show that was hysterically awesome. I honestly thought the boys might have called it quits after number two, but now it just seems they will no doubt make these until they just can't handle the pain or the stress anymore. After the stellar opening weekend this film had there is no doubt the studio will be pushing these guys for another one. It is beginning to show a tad here as none of these stunts are as extreme as some in the previous films or series. They even recycle some here with the whole bull thing only adding elements to it such as painting Knoxville to blend in with his surroundings. As the antics are a little less extreme the imagination at least seems to be working just as hard. Segments including a bar fight including midgets as well as the opportunity to mess around with a plane offer up some pretty great moments. As this is more a share all about some of my favorite stunts in the film rather than a review, I must say it was interesting how this one seemed to show a little more of each of the guys personalities. Whereas in the previous films they cut away quicker we are left to linger on these guys and get a small glimpse into a life where you inflict pain upon yourself for a living. There isn't really a way to dislike the film unless you are simply grossed out easily, but it is pure fun and you can't help but laugh at how well they act like idiots. Some of the bits do fall flat, but they are so short you hardly notice them as they are surrounded by classic bits like a guy farting into a dart blower and popping a balloon in Steve-o's ass or having wee man and Preston super glue themselves together in a sexual position. Sadly, I didn't think it wise of myself to spend an extra five bucks or so on watching poop in 3-d so i went ahead and settled for the regular 2-d magic of 'Jackass' though I was looking out for moments that could use the technology to its advantage, but to be honest I didn't see much and don't feel as if I missed out on anything too special. Its gross, its crass, its loud and obnoxious, but as always the jackass crew provides some serious fun and almost constant laughter. If you've seen the others you might as well see this one, you won't be disappointed.

JACKASS 3D Review

Let's be for real here, this is 'Jackass' and there is no need to review it whatsoever. If you plan on going to see this movie you know what you are getting yourself into. This is another extended edition of the MTV show that was hysterically awesome. I honestly thought the boys might have called it quits after number two, but now it just seems they will no doubt make these until they just can't handle the pain or the stress anymore. After the stellar opening weekend this film had there is no doubt the studio will be pushing these guys for another one. It is beginning to show a tad here as none of these stunts are as extreme as some in the previous films or series. They even recycle some here with the whole bull thing only adding elements to it such as painting Knoxville to blend in with his surroundings. As the antics are a little less extreme the imagination at least seems to be working just as hard. Segments including a bar fight including midgets as well as the opportunity to mess around with a plane offer up some pretty great moments. As this is more a share all about some of my favorite stunts in the film rather than a review, I must say it was interesting how this one seemed to show a little more of each of the guys personalities. Whereas in the previous films they cut away quicker we are left to linger on these guys and get a small glimpse into a life where you inflict pain upon yourself for a living. There isn't really a way to dislike the film unless you are simply grossed out easily, but it is pure fun and you can't help but laugh at how well they act like idiots. Some of the bits do fall flat, but they are so short you hardly notice them as they are surrounded by classic bits like a guy farting into a dart blower and popping a balloon in Steve-o's ass or having wee man and Preston super glue themselves together in a sexual position. Sadly, I didn't think it wise of myself to spend an extra five bucks or so on watching poop in 3-d so i went ahead and settled for the regular 2-d magic of 'Jackass' though I was looking out for moments that could use the technology to its advantage, but to be honest I didn't see much and don't feel as if I missed out on anything too special. Its gross, its crass, its loud and obnoxious, but as always the jackass crew provides some serious fun and almost constant laughter. If you've seen the others you might as well see this one, you won't be disappointed.

RED Review

It is fair to say that Bruce Willis hasn't had a legitimate hit in a while. This is mostly due to the fact some of his recent endeavors haven't been of the highest quality-don't act like you haven't already forgotten 'Cop Out' or 'Surrogates'. So to see him lead an all star band of veteran pros in 'RED' is both refreshing and thrilling. As a retired CIA agent it is obviously hard for him to adjust to the calm suburban life where he finds a sliver of happiness in calling Sarah (Mary-Louise Parker) a phone operator he rips up his pension checks in order to talk to. When a mysterious someone wants him dead the action begins and Willis must put his old gang back together to figure everything out. Though the story is rather familiar in the ways of government conspiracies and action heroes uncovering it that's not to say this isn't a fun ride because it is honestly one of the funnest films I've seen this year. Most of this is due to the genius of casting golden actors in roles that aren't as prestigious as they may have been advertised to be. Helen Mirren isn't introduced until around the half way point but even so she provides some of the more memorable scenes in the film. Watching Helen Mirren firing a machine gun in a dress and combat boots is one of the best and funniest things I've seen in a while. This leads to another fantastic thing the film is able to do. Balancing the comedy and action better than most. As the LSD-induced Marvin, John Malkovich nearly steals every scene he is in. He is funny without being ridiculous, in fact he is very serious, serious as can be. Constantly worrying the government is watching and always on the watch. A scene involving him and a pink pig is one that will most likely be discussed as the high point of the film. What is great to watch though is the way Willis, Malkovich and Morgan Freeman work together. Freeman also has a smaller sized role than you may have thought, but it is impossible not to like the man and he adds one of the most touching scenes to the film. To see all of these great actors working together and to see them really getting into the material certainly elevates the film to a level it certainly wouldn't have reached otherwise. Seeing as 'RED' was written by the guys who wrote last years pretty plain Kate Beckinsale flop 'Whiteout' this could have been a complete disaster, but the acting talent along with director Robert Schwentke's ability to capture a nice action scene on film not only makes 'RED' a funny and exciting movie to watch in a packed theater but it is one you genuinely enjoy, one you could watch repeat viewings of and wouldn't mind. It is also a film that should give Willis a well deserved hit. He anchors the film well and his relationship with Sarah is a high point of a movie full of good moments. It is worth mentioning Karl Urban as well, who hot off his star making role in last summers 'Star Trek' plays a man of many layers here. HE is initially used as the clear antagonist, but by the end he is turned around and given actual human qualities. Lastly, I have to talk about the audience for the film-it is one that could turn out to be a marketing wonder. I attended an early show yesterday and was surprised at the number of older people in attendance. The pedigree of the cast will attract the elders during the day and the action element I suspect will attract younger crowds at the later shows. Its a win-win situation and I hope it works. I loved the film.

RED Review

It is fair to say that Bruce Willis hasn't had a legitimate hit in a while. This is mostly due to the fact some of his recent endeavors haven't been of the highest quality-don't act like you haven't already forgotten 'Cop Out' or 'Surrogates'. So to see him lead an all star band of veteran pros in 'RED' is both refreshing and thrilling. As a retired CIA agent it is obviously hard for him to adjust to the calm suburban life where he finds a sliver of happiness in calling Sarah (Mary-Louise Parker) a phone operator he rips up his pension checks in order to talk to. When a mysterious someone wants him dead the action begins and Willis must put his old gang back together to figure everything out. Though the story is rather familiar in the ways of government conspiracies and action heroes uncovering it that's not to say this isn't a fun ride because it is honestly one of the funnest films I've seen this year. Most of this is due to the genius of casting golden actors in roles that aren't as prestigious as they may have been advertised to be. Helen Mirren isn't introduced until around the half way point but even so she provides some of the more memorable scenes in the film. Watching Helen Mirren firing a machine gun in a dress and combat boots is one of the best and funniest things I've seen in a while. This leads to another fantastic thing the film is able to do. Balancing the comedy and action better than most. As the LSD-induced Marvin, John Malkovich nearly steals every scene he is in. He is funny without being ridiculous, in fact he is very serious, serious as can be. Constantly worrying the government is watching and always on the watch. A scene involving him and a pink pig is one that will most likely be discussed as the high point of the film. What is great to watch though is the way Willis, Malkovich and Morgan Freeman work together. Freeman also has a smaller sized role than you may have thought, but it is impossible not to like the man and he adds one of the most touching scenes to the film. To see all of these great actors working together and to see them really getting into the material certainly elevates the film to a level it certainly wouldn't have reached otherwise. Seeing as 'RED' was written by the guys who wrote last years pretty plain Kate Beckinsale flop 'Whiteout' this could have been a complete disaster, but the acting talent along with director Robert Schwentke's ability to capture a nice action scene on film not only makes 'RED' a funny and exciting movie to watch in a packed theater but it is one you genuinely enjoy, one you could watch repeat viewings of and wouldn't mind. It is also a film that should give Willis a well deserved hit. He anchors the film well and his relationship with Sarah is a high point of a movie full of good moments. It is worth mentioning Karl Urban as well, who hot off his star making role in last summers 'Star Trek' plays a man of many layers here. HE is initially used as the clear antagonist, but by the end he is turned around and given actual human qualities. Lastly, I have to talk about the audience for the film-it is one that could turn out to be a marketing wonder. I attended an early show yesterday and was surprised at the number of older people in attendance. The pedigree of the cast will attract the elders during the day and the action element I suspect will attract younger crowds at the later shows. Its a win-win situation and I hope it works. I loved the film.

IT'S KIND OF A FUNNY STORY Review

'It's Kind of a Funny Story' is indeed that. With a rather impressive ensemble cast handling complicated emotions this little film certainly has a lot going for it. I haven't seen Keir Gilchrist in anything prior to this film but as our main character Craig I was impressed by his ability to handle the heavy and comedic elements of the script with a natural state of mind. We could see the way he thought and why he thought and felt these very specific ways. This is good as it is kind of the point of the movie and is vital to its plot. Craig is a little depressed, as we all can get-I understand that but I can sometimes have issues and find it hard to feel sorry for people who are unable to handle tough situations and insist on turning to medicine to solve their own mind issues I liked that the script never made Craig a moaner, or someone who was looking for our pity-instead he is just looking for someone to turn to and even a cynic like me "gets this" kind of yearning in a seventeen year old boy who sees everything everyone else has that he doesn't. In feeling this way and creating an interesting atmosphere for the film Craig checks himself into a mental health hospital. Here we encounter many characters and many more plot lines. Gifted director Ryan Fleck handles this well and though I found his focus to sometimes linger a little long on Craig and not on some of the more interesting supporting characters. As genuine as Craig is and as touching as his situation can be it is a fact that it might have been more interesting to see a movie centered around one of his new found friends at the hospital. The obvious choice here would of course be Bob played with charming wit and dark undertones by Zach Galifianakis. As one of the first people Craig befriends, we are immediately wondering why Bob has ended up here, what has happened to him or what he might have done to be placed here. Galifanakis is able to show a diverse angle to his now famously odd persona. The film is only sometimes laugh out loud funny, but has a constant tone that makes you smile. Sadly, Bob mainly works as Craig's counselor, helping him work through the pressures of being a teenager that include talking to girls. Craig is awful at this and we are treated to small segments into Craig's mind as to how he sees his situation and how he would LIKE to see his situations. These offer the film a little indie cred as well as some fantastic moment that include the entire cast, dressed in full Bowie gear performing "Under Pressure". The break out for me here though is that girl Craig eventually has to talk to-Emma Roberts, creating some real credibility for her name after starring in more tween aimed vehicles, playing a teen who has attempted suicide is quite a turn. She plays it well too. She is the one who opens up the conversation-she is a rebel with a good heart, someone not afraid to bluntly express her emotions and unafraid to say she has some issues. She is beautiful and don't know why it takes Craig so long to build his courage up and close the deal on what we all know is coming. While I feel 'It's Kind of a Funny Story' could certainly use have used some more story, such as a better resolution to the Bob character, but it is a tidy and touching story. One we don't have a problem smiling at as we leave the theater.

IT'S KIND OF A FUNNY STORY Review

'It's Kind of a Funny Story' is indeed that. With a rather impressive ensemble cast handling complicated emotions this little film certainly has a lot going for it. I haven't seen Keir Gilchrist in anything prior to this film but as our main character Craig I was impressed by his ability to handle the heavy and comedic elements of the script with a natural state of mind. We could see the way he thought and why he thought and felt these very specific ways. This is good as it is kind of the point of the movie and is vital to its plot. Craig is a little depressed, as we all can get-I understand that but I can sometimes have issues and find it hard to feel sorry for people who are unable to handle tough situations and insist on turning to medicine to solve their own mind issues I liked that the script never made Craig a moaner, or someone who was looking for our pity-instead he is just looking for someone to turn to and even a cynic like me "gets this" kind of yearning in a seventeen year old boy who sees everything everyone else has that he doesn't. In feeling this way and creating an interesting atmosphere for the film Craig checks himself into a mental health hospital. Here we encounter many characters and many more plot lines. Gifted director Ryan Fleck handles this well and though I found his focus to sometimes linger a little long on Craig and not on some of the more interesting supporting characters. As genuine as Craig is and as touching as his situation can be it is a fact that it might have been more interesting to see a movie centered around one of his new found friends at the hospital. The obvious choice here would of course be Bob played with charming wit and dark undertones by Zach Galifianakis. As one of the first people Craig befriends, we are immediately wondering why Bob has ended up here, what has happened to him or what he might have done to be placed here. Galifanakis is able to show a diverse angle to his now famously odd persona. The film is only sometimes laugh out loud funny, but has a constant tone that makes you smile. Sadly, Bob mainly works as Craig's counselor, helping him work through the pressures of being a teenager that include talking to girls. Craig is awful at this and we are treated to small segments into Craig's mind as to how he sees his situation and how he would LIKE to see his situations. These offer the film a little indie cred as well as some fantastic moment that include the entire cast, dressed in full Bowie gear performing "Under Pressure". The break out for me here though is that girl Craig eventually has to talk to-Emma Roberts, creating some real credibility for her name after starring in more tween aimed vehicles, playing a teen who has attempted suicide is quite a turn. She plays it well too. She is the one who opens up the conversation-she is a rebel with a good heart, someone not afraid to bluntly express her emotions and unafraid to say she has some issues. She is beautiful and don't know why it takes Craig so long to build his courage up and close the deal on what we all know is coming. While I feel 'It's Kind of a Funny Story' could certainly use have used some more story, such as a better resolution to the Bob character, but it is a tidy and touching story. One we don't have a problem smiling at as we leave the theater.

MACHETE Review

'Machete' succeeds in what it is trying to be. An extension of Rodriguez and Tarantino's 'Grindhouse'. It is over-the-top and ridiculous but it is supposed to be. It makes little sense and sadly turns into a stage for Rodriguez to harp on the illegal immigrant issue. We come to 'Machete' looking for nothing more than moronic fun and an exploitation film of epic proportions we are not looking to be taught a lesson, but are indeed given that as the movie drags to its highlight of a conclusion that promises two more films. Danny Trejo is not your ideal leading man and is never as full of charisma as we'd like to imagine or as that fake trailer set him up to be. I guess that is where I find the disappointment in the full feature. As a gimmick between the Grindhouse features it was one of pure hilarity and campiness. It was one of the best parts of the double feature and as with most things in Hollywood, if something can churn out more money it will likely be made to do so. With that in mind 'Machete' is a funny exploitation film, it is no 'Black Dynamite' but it is fair enough, it just doesn't live up to the expectations those who were looking forward to it, held for it. It does boast a pretty awesome cast though. Besides Trejo we have DeNiro as a corrupt senator who has a hard vendetta against illegal aliens. Michelle Rodriguez is criminally underused here as the luminous She. I would have rather seen her in the Jessica Alba role if it meant she received more screen time, but it was good to see her sport an eye-patch and kick some butt in the final showdown between the Mexican "Network" and the secret agency that DeNiros character has created to kill them as they cross the border. I simply cannot accept Alba as a serious actress. Even when she tries in such films as this and 'The Killer Inside Me'. She never comes off as credible or accurate, just as a pretty girl attempting to act like a grown-up and here a hard ass that we know isn't anything close to the truth. Jeff Fahey is the only one here who seems to get what the makers are exactly going for. He is over the top in his delivery and actions though Steven Seagal does a pretty good job at doing an even worse impersonation of his usual persona. Cheech Marin is added in for a few laughs as is Don Johnson and the sight of Lindsay Lohan in a nun outfit is the most bizarre and ridiculous thing you will see on a movie screen all year. I wouldn't watch 'Machete' again and I don't know that I would recommend it to anyone, but it is a rather fun and campy ride. One i enjoyed but wouldn't care to re-live.

MACHETE Review

'Machete' succeeds in what it is trying to be. An extension of Rodriguez and Tarantino's 'Grindhouse'. It is over-the-top and ridiculous but it is supposed to be. It makes little sense and sadly turns into a stage for Rodriguez to harp on the illegal immigrant issue. We come to 'Machete' looking for nothing more than moronic fun and an exploitation film of epic proportions we are not looking to be taught a lesson, but are indeed given that as the movie drags to its highlight of a conclusion that promises two more films. Danny Trejo is not your ideal leading man and is never as full of charisma as we'd like to imagine or as that fake trailer set him up to be. I guess that is where I find the disappointment in the full feature. As a gimmick between the Grindhouse features it was one of pure hilarity and campiness. It was one of the best parts of the double feature and as with most things in Hollywood, if something can churn out more money it will likely be made to do so. With that in mind 'Machete' is a funny exploitation film, it is no 'Black Dynamite' but it is fair enough, it just doesn't live up to the expectations those who were looking forward to it, held for it. It does boast a pretty awesome cast though. Besides Trejo we have DeNiro as a corrupt senator who has a hard vendetta against illegal aliens. Michelle Rodriguez is criminally underused here as the luminous She. I would have rather seen her in the Jessica Alba role if it meant she received more screen time, but it was good to see her sport an eye-patch and kick some butt in the final showdown between the Mexican "Network" and the secret agency that DeNiros character has created to kill them as they cross the border. I simply cannot accept Alba as a serious actress. Even when she tries in such films as this and 'The Killer Inside Me'. She never comes off as credible or accurate, just as a pretty girl attempting to act like a grown-up and here a hard ass that we know isn't anything close to the truth. Jeff Fahey is the only one here who seems to get what the makers are exactly going for. He is over the top in his delivery and actions though Steven Seagal does a pretty good job at doing an even worse impersonation of his usual persona. Cheech Marin is added in for a few laughs as is Don Johnson and the sight of Lindsay Lohan in a nun outfit is the most bizarre and ridiculous thing you will see on a movie screen all year. I wouldn't watch 'Machete' again and I don't know that I would recommend it to anyone, but it is a rather fun and campy ride. One i enjoyed but wouldn't care to re-live.

THE SOCIAL NETWORK Review

We will never know the whole truth and nothing but that truth, so after walking out of David Fincher's much hyped 'The Social Network' we are left wondering how much of this intriguing tale is actually fact. The basics have to be right? The people are all so believable, they aren't characters, they're just real and the events, it all must have happened just like that right? The thing about it is, Fincher's film is so straightforward it is hard to believe that any of this is an embellishment of the truth or at least some peoples version of it. Either way, everything you have heard about the movie is probably true. What makes the fuss around this film is not the usual reasons you talk about movies-there are no stars, no epic sequences of amazing camera work or special effects-what we have here that is so intriguing is the relevance of the story. Relevance, it's the biggest thing 'The Social Network' has on its side, and that is a very good thing because it is very well made and completely enthralling. As our main protagonist and creator of facebook, Jesse Eisenberg plays Mark Zuckerberg with a fury of quick wit, intelligence and pure snarkiness. It is ironic that this squirelly college sophomore who turns to blogging to take his frustrations out after being dumped, this obviously socially awkward fella who has as many friends as you have fingers on one hand created the biggest social networking site in history. In that, is where we find our interest, in his accomplishment is our daily lives. As I write this review it is on the site that is the subject of the movie-that sounds all so backwards but proves how much our lives are dominated by what this man, this teenager at the time, did. From the opening scene, which chronicles the aforementioned break-up, we immediately are fed the tone and technique of the film. It is dialogue and character driven, it is within these interesting conversation that smart people have that we are told the story of the origin of facebook, the events that influenced the site, the people who were lied to and back stabbed along the way. Fincher shoots the movie very steady, no moving camera tricks, just static capturing the performances. He puts them in neutral colors and gives different points of view over one coherent story as to how this all went down. Who knew the creation of a website could be so rich with drama and deceit. Writer Aaron Sorkin delivers scene after scene that overlap and reveal the true colors of every person on screen. It is pure poetry and the actors, who have a huge job on this film, do the writing justice and bring this story to life. Timberlake is finally given a credible platform to stretch his acting skills and as Napster co-founder Sean Parker we can see him playing somewhat of himself, but with more of a flair for the attention getter. On the other end is Andrew Garfield who, after Eisenberg is the most affecting. As Eduardo Saverin he is our most empathetic character and the one we hate to see betrayed, the one we side with in the small intervals of attorney delegations, no matter how much we want to believe Zuckerberg did this without hurting anyone, the proof isn't there for that, but his character is much deeper than the jerk genius he comes off as on the surface. Armie Hammer also deserves to be mentioned for playing both Winklevoss twins who say they had the original idea that Zuckerberg drew on to create the facebook. There is so much to say about the film I can hardly express it all here, but that the goal of it was to be cool, to see what others are up to, to know who's in a relationship and who's not anymore, that the whole thing grew from the need for revenge on a scorned lover, of not feeling included or elite. It is what the world is about, it touches on so many human emotions and it is all filtered through a page of your very own on the Internet. It is a cultural phenomenon and we are lucky to have a film that chronicles how something big can come from the most basic emotions that we all share. It is jolting, effective, complex and nothing like you probably thought.

THE SOCIAL NETWORK Review

We will never know the whole truth and nothing but that truth, so after walking out of David Fincher's much hyped 'The Social Network' we are left wondering how much of this intriguing tale is actually fact. The basics have to be right? The people are all so believable, they aren't characters, they're just real and the events, it all must have happened just like that right? The thing about it is, Fincher's film is so straightforward it is hard to believe that any of this is an embellishment of the truth or at least some peoples version of it. Either way, everything you have heard about the movie is probably true. What makes the fuss around this film is not the usual reasons you talk about movies-there are no stars, no epic sequences of amazing camera work or special effects-what we have here that is so intriguing is the relevance of the story. Relevance, it's the biggest thing 'The Social Network' has on its side, and that is a very good thing because it is very well made and completely enthralling. As our main protagonist and creator of facebook, Jesse Eisenberg plays Mark Zuckerberg with a fury of quick wit, intelligence and pure snarkiness. It is ironic that this squirelly college sophomore who turns to blogging to take his frustrations out after being dumped, this obviously socially awkward fella who has as many friends as you have fingers on one hand created the biggest social networking site in history. In that, is where we find our interest, in his accomplishment is our daily lives. As I write this review it is on the site that is the subject of the movie-that sounds all so backwards but proves how much our lives are dominated by what this man, this teenager at the time, did. From the opening scene, which chronicles the aforementioned break-up, we immediately are fed the tone and technique of the film. It is dialogue and character driven, it is within these interesting conversation that smart people have that we are told the story of the origin of facebook, the events that influenced the site, the people who were lied to and back stabbed along the way. Fincher shoots the movie very steady, no moving camera tricks, just static capturing the performances. He puts them in neutral colors and gives different points of view over one coherent story as to how this all went down. Who knew the creation of a website could be so rich with drama and deceit. Writer Aaron Sorkin delivers scene after scene that overlap and reveal the true colors of every person on screen. It is pure poetry and the actors, who have a huge job on this film, do the writing justice and bring this story to life. Timberlake is finally given a credible platform to stretch his acting skills and as Napster co-founder Sean Parker we can see him playing somewhat of himself, but with more of a flair for the attention getter. On the other end is Andrew Garfield who, after Eisenberg is the most affecting. As Eduardo Saverin he is our most empathetic character and the one we hate to see betrayed, the one we side with in the small intervals of attorney delegations, no matter how much we want to believe Zuckerberg did this without hurting anyone, the proof isn't there for that, but his character is much deeper than the jerk genius he comes off as on the surface. Armie Hammer also deserves to be mentioned for playing both Winklevoss twins who say they had the original idea that Zuckerberg drew on to create the facebook. There is so much to say about the film I can hardly express it all here, but that the goal of it was to be cool, to see what others are up to, to know who's in a relationship and who's not anymore, that the whole thing grew from the need for revenge on a scorned lover, of not feeling included or elite. It is what the world is about, it touches on so many human emotions and it is all filtered through a page of your very own on the Internet. It is a cultural phenomenon and we are lucky to have a film that chronicles how something big can come from the most basic emotions that we all share. It is jolting, effective, complex and nothing like you probably thought.