Teaser Trailer for MEN, WOMEN & CHILDREN

It is easy to dismiss director Jason Reitman's last film, the overly sentimental and rather sappy Labor Day, but for what it's worth I didn't mind the film. If not for it's higher class of acting based in a Nicholas Sparks world at least for the cinematography and somewhat melodically paced story. It was though, admittedly odd coming from the same filmmaker who made dramedy's along the lines of Juno and Young Adult while going slightly darker with the superb Up in the Air. With his latest, it looks like Reitman will once again be skewing towards the darker side of things rather than retreating to a safe haven of comedy after Labor Day was lambasted by critics. Based on Chad Kulten's novel of the same name the film will follow high school students and their parents and how all of their lives have seemingly become dictated by the Internet, social media and the new types of "connections" we all have. The trailer is quite a downer, but at the same time is immensely engaging and seems to promise some rather intense situations and revelatory situations concerning a fair amount of the characters glimpsed. It seems to be quite reminiscent of the very much underrated Disconnect from 2012 while mimicking the tone of The Social Network. Even after Labor Day though I am still very interested in anything Reitman attempts and so I'm eager to see what twist he puts on this now typical cautionary tale. Men, Women & Children stars Ansel Elgort, Adam Sandler, Rosemarie DeWitt, Jennifer Garner, Judy Greer, Kaitlyn Dever, Dean Norris, J.K. Simmons, Timothée Chalamet, Olivia Crocicchia, Emma Thompson and will have its world premiere at the 2014 Toronto International Film Festival while opening in limited release on October 3rd.



Synopsis: “MEN, WOMEN & CHILDREN” follows the story of a group of high school teenagers and their parents as they attempt to navigate the many ways the internet has changed their relationships, their communication, their self-image, and their love lives. The film attempts to stare down social issues such as video game culture, anorexia, infidelity, fame hunting, and the proliferation of illicit material on the internet. As each character and each relationship is tested, we are shown the variety of roads people choose – some tragic, some hopeful – as it becomes clear that no one is immune to this enormous social change that has come through our phones, our tablets, and our computers.