On DVD & Blu-Ray: April 14, 2020


The third film from director Destin Daniel Cretton (Short Term 12, The Glass Castle) stars Michael B. Jordan, Jamie Foxx, and Brie Larson in the true story of a Harvard-educated lawyer named Bryan Stevenson (based on a book written by the actual Stevenson) who goes to Alabama in the late eighties to defend the disenfranchised and wrongly condemned including Foxx's Walter McMillian, a man sentenced to death despite evidence proving his innocence.

Every single word in that description would lead one to believe Just Mercy is an inevitably powerful film that is both timely and timeless as it touches on the indifference to inequality and justice in our society as its been fated to have been constructed; a world with a “justice deficient” as Stevenson would describe it, so why then...does everything about Just Mercy feel as formulaic as the old gospel hymns referenced within it? There's no taking away that this is a good movie, but there's no denying it goes down exactly as you expect it to also. That isn't to say the story isn't important or to criticize the story the film is telling, but more it is a recognition that Cretton and co-writer Andrew Lanham (The Shack) might have done more to execute this in a fashion not so routine; to find a way of conveying the story in unexpected ways rather than resting on the fact the true story is compelling enough on its own. Video review here. Full review here. B-

K-Stew bustin' out the body of a deep sea alien in a scuba space suit is worth the price of admission (or rental fee) for Underwater alone.

William Eubank's (The Signal) visuals are surprisingly stellar in this rather intense and inventive creature feature that is claustrophobic AF and gleefully pessimistic to the point it makes you legitimately doubt anything good could ever happen to our protagonists in the circumstances the plot plops them into. C+

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